all the things

on caring for the sick

I am terrible at caring for sick people.

TERRIBLE.

I fully know this stems from a childhood where if I were “sick”, I would still have to go about the day – go to school, cross country practice, etc. Thankfully, I was rarely sick, but it was often looked upon with skepticism.

Unfortunately, the skepticism has carried over and I tend to doubt if people are truly sick even if they say so. I need evidence – a thermometer that shows a fever, something. Anything.

So, when someone says they are sick, I immediately look for a cause and try to treat it. But, I’m not a doctor, so I don’t really know what I am talking about.

I am not kind when someone is ill.

I am sometimes unnecessarily harsh. Mostly unknowingly.

She Reads Truth is going through the Fruit of the Spirit in its daily devotionals right now. Today’s topic is kindness.

And be kind and compassionate to one another, forgiving one another, just as God also forgave you in Christ.
– Ephesians 4:32, HCSB

My lack of kindness recently toward my husband while he was sick is the opposite of this verse. Naturally, this verse struck a chord that resonated very deeply.

Ouch.

The Greek word for kindness used in Galatians 5 is chrēstotēs, which means “moral goodness” and “benignity.” Benignity means bringing a person no harm. Christ uses the root of this word chrēstos in Matthew 11:30, when He says His “yoke is easy”—meaning, it doesn’t needlessly burden.

I may have had an upbringing that encouraged the lack of kindness during sickness, but burdens the sick. I remember feeling as if my parents didn’t believe me, didn’t trust me, when I said I was sick.

And that’s how I am making people feel now. I am purposefully burdening others.

Biblical kindness requires abiding in the Source, yielding to the Spirit, and submitting to the Heavenly Father.

Oh how I need to lean on my Heavenly Father in places where my earthly parents inadvertently failed me.

Thank God He offers forgiveness freely for broken people like me.

And, please forgive me if I have ever unnecessarily shared a mantle of burden with you while you were ill.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s